Why Does The Landscape Around Mexico City Look Cracked?

Answer:

Always short of water, Mexico City keeps drilling deeper for more, weakening the ancient clay lake beds on which the Aztecs first built much of the city, causing it to crumble even further.

Answer:

It’s the result of a geological phenomenon called subsidence, which usually happens when too much water is drawn from underground, and the land above begins to compact. According to new modeling by the two researchers and their colleagues, parts of the city are sinking as much as 20 inches a year.


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Frequently Asked Questions

Why is the land in Mexico City sinking?

The phenomenon is called subsidence, and it could be a big problem for nearly half of Mexico City's population. Subsidence happens when too much groundwater is extracted, causing the land above it to compact, and sink.

Why is Mexico City sinking around a foot per year?

Mexico City is sinking. So much water has been pumped out from the aquifer beneath it to satisfy the metropolitan area's 18 million residents that the ground is collapsing underfoot at a stunning rate. Many cities have experienced subsidence. ... Early in this century the fast-growing city exhausted its natural springs.

Why is the ground beneath Mexico City subsiding?

It's the result of a geological phenomenon called subsidence, which usually happens when too much water is drawn from underground, and the land above begins to compact. According to new modeling by the two researchers and their colleagues, parts of the city are sinking as much as 20 inches a year.

What are some problems that Mexico City is facing?

Problematic housing, snarled traffic, and stubborn air pollution are three of the most prominent challenges in greater Mexico City, which is the largest metropolitan area in the Western Hemisphere and the fifth-largest in the world.

How is the climate in Mexico City affected?

Mexico City’s climate is influenced by its high elevation, its limited air circulation owing to the mountains surrounding it on three sides, and its exposure to both tropical air masses and cold northerly fronts. The latter make southward intrusions only during the Northern Hemisphere winter and spring.

Where to see the ruins in Mexico City?

Heading south to the Tepozteco is a highly recommended Mexico City day trip and a must-do activity for fans of history and outdoor activities alike. Situated atop the Tepozteco mountain in Morelos state, the Tepozteco ruins are rather impressive, even by Mexican standards.

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