What Is A Landscape Follie?

Answer:

A garden folly is usually considered a building or structure that is designed for decoration with no other purpose than to add a touch of whimsy or extravagance to the surrounding landscape.

Answer:

Folly, (from French folie, “foolishness”), also called Eyecatcher, in architecture, a costly, generally nonfunctional building that was erected to enhance a natural landscape.


Of bridges, temples and other follies (RoPeCast #088)


Winterthur’s Green Folly from Follies: Architectural Whimsy in the Garden exhibition


ASMR/Relaxation – Follies – Eccentricity & Splendour in the British Landscape (history/architecture)


Frequently Asked Questions

What is the purpose of a folly?

Though follies were sometimes used as pavilions, they were typically built for visual effect alone, and, with other deliberately wrought effects—such as simulated grottoes and rocky chasms—they were intended to improve or complete the natural setting.

What is a folly in the UK?

Follies (French: fabriques) were an important feature of the English garden and French landscape garden in the 18th century, such as Stowe and Stourhead in England and Ermenonville and the gardens of Versailles in France. They were usually in the form of Roman temples, ruined Gothic abbeys, or Egyptian pyramids.

What is a folly in Scotland?

Scottish National Dictionary (1700–) FOLLY, n. Also follie. A prank, a piece of fun (Sh. 1952), with slightly derogatory force.

Where did the word folly originate from?

The word folly dates back to the early 13th century, originally meaning “foolishness” or “unwise conduct.” It comes from a French word meaning “mad,” as in “deranged.” In its plural form, follies has referred to “absurdities” since at least the 1400s.

What does a folly do in a garden?

In theory, a folly is a nonessential building that often serves as a garden focal point or eye-catcher, drawing attention to a desired view and encouraging visitors to explore.

Where are the Follies in the English landscape?

There are pyramids at Castle Howard (as well as mock-fortifications), Farley Mount (Hampshire) and St. Ives (Cornwall). More eccentric still was the mock village, and the sham castle, as at Mow Cop (Cheshire). At Scotney Castle (Kent) the old castle was deliberately made into an ivy-clad romantic ruin when the new house was built.

Where can I get garden follies in the UK?

Garden folly suppliers such as Chapter House Design in the United Kingdom can help you realize your folly fantasy like this gothic creation which could function as a children’s playhouse.

Where did the term folly come from in architecture?

Folly, (from French folie, “foolishness”), also called Eyecatcher, in architecture, a costly, generally nonfunctional building that was erected to enhance a natural landscape. Follies first gained popularity in England, and they were particularly in vogue during the 18th and early 19th centuries, when landscape design was dominated by the tenets...

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