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Frequently Asked Questions

How do I make my yard dog-friendly?

12 Ways to a Dog-Friendly Backyard

  1. Keep it fenced. Don't give your dog the independence to run all over your neighbor's yard. ...
  2. Don't neglect your fence. ...
  3. Include “peeking” areas. ...
  4. Dedicate a digging area. ...
  5. Create a water feature. ...
  6. Deny access to dangerous materials. ...
  7. Offer some shade. ...
  8. Dogscape your yard.

What can I use instead of grass for my dog?

Clover: Clover is safe for dogs to eat and is tougher than grass and less likely to stain. Synthetic turf: Turf is a low maintenance option that will not stain. It also reduces the need for other types of yard work, like mowing, and stops your dog from digging.

What landscaping plants are safe for dogs?

15 Dog-Safe Plants You Can Add to Almost Any Garden Right Now

  • Camellia. ...
  • Dill. ...
  • Dog-Safe Garden Marigold Plants. ...
  • Fuchsias. ...
  • Magnolia Bushes. ...
  • Purple Basil Dog-Safe Plant. ...
  • Sunflower. ...
  • Rosemary.

What to look for in a pet friendly yard?

The first and most important element of pet-friendly backyard landscaping to keep in mind is plant selection, as many seemingly harmless plants can be toxic to pets (and children). The ASPCA is an excellent resource for finding out which plants should be on your watch list.

Can a dog be in a dog friendly landscape?

When your closest family members include dogs, it’s important to consider how they use your landscape, too. Don’t believe the naysayers. Lawns, landscapes and healthy, playful hounds can coexist. With a few simple considerations, you and Fido can enjoy the ideal dog-friendly landscape.

Who is the best landscape architect for dogs?

Colorado-based landscape architect Kristin Heggem, an expert in pet-friendly landscape design, explains that approaches may vary significantly based on the size of your dog. “Large dogs need space to run, while smaller dogs use space differently,” she says.

What kind of plants should I plant in my yard for my Dog?

Steer clear of plants that are toxic to dogs if eaten. According to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, that includes common plants such as aloe vera, yews and azaleas. Instead of poisonous plants, opt for ASPCA-approved plants, including camellias, coreopsis and nasturtiums.

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