Are There Bathrooms On Essex Steam Train?

This year, step back in time to historic 1892 Essex Station and embark on an unforgettable 2.5-hour journey into the heart of the unspoiled Connecticut River Valley. A steam locomotive pulls vintage coaches on a narrated round-trip through the quintessential New England towns of Deep River and Chester.

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All aboard the Santa Special for a one-of-a-kind, daytime holiday experience! Enjoy the spirit of the season as you relax with family and friends aboard festive railway cars adorned with vintage decorations. Make sure you’re camera-ready for that “special moment” when Santa and Mrs. Claus visit each child.

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The Valley Railroad CompanyAnswer:

Are there bathrooms on the train and/or riverboat? There are small bathrooms available on the train and the boat. The bathrooms on the boat are on the lower level which is accessed by a full staircase from the level you board onto the boat. It is suggested to use the bathrooms at Essex Station before your excursion.


Take a Ride on the Essex Steam Train and Riverboat!


Valley Railroad – Essex Steam Train in Connecticut


A Ride on the Essex Steam Train


Frequently Asked Questions

Does the Essex Steam train have a bathroom?

There are small bathrooms available on the train and the boat. The bathrooms on the boat are on the lower level which is accessed by a full staircase from the level you board onto the boat. It is suggested to use the bathrooms at Essex Station before your excursion.

How long is the Essex Steam train ride?

2.5-hourThe Valley Railroad Company – operating the Essex Steam Train & Riverboat – has been serving the lower Connecticut River Valley since 1971.

Where is the steam train coming from in Essex?

The train will then leave Winchester at 5.10pm for its return journey back to Southend. The showstopper, of course, is the steam train that will be pulling the carriages on its trip through Essex towards Hampshire. Built for the London and North Eastern Railway, 61306 Mayflower is just one of two surviving B1 Class locomotives.

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